Exploring Uphill, the quiet end of Weston-super-Mare, Somerset

Weston-super-Mare may not be the most fashionable or upmarket of resorts but whenever we visit we have a great day out. This time we did something a little different. The kids are too old for donkey rides and building sandcastles (sob) so we explored Uphill, a village on the outskirts of Weston-super-Mare.

We walked south along Weston’s promenade, passing Funland, an outdoor theme park, which has replaced Banksy’s Dismaland. After a short beach stretch we turned inland just before the golf course. This road took us almost directly to Uphill, only 20 minutes or so walking but a world away from Weston.

Uphill Nature Reserve
Uphill Hill Nature Reserve

Arriving in Uphill we passed the sweetly named Donkey Field. In years gone by this has been used as a retirement field for a local donkey and as pasture for the Weston beach donkeys. We didn’t see any donkeys but a few Dexter cattle were grazing in one corner. Despite their horns the kids thought these miniature cattle were very cute.

Uphill Hill Local Nature Reserve

We were aiming for Uphill Hill Nature Reserve. However I somehow managed to walk past the main entrance and arrive at the boatyard instead. Conveniently home to the only cafe in the village so we stopped for a drink and bite to eat.

Suitably refreshed we followed the sign past the boats to Uphill Hill Nature Reserve. As befits its name, the reserve is primarily a hill; its limestone grassland covered in flowers each spring. An old windmill tower and partially ruined church top the hill.

Windmill Tower, Uphill Nature Reserve
Windmill Tower, Uphill Hill Nature Reserve

There are fantastic views from Windmill Tower; Brean Down and Weston Bay in one direction, inland Somerset the other. I didn’t realise at the time but it’s possible to climb the tower for even better views. Although the kids were keen to avoid the cattle grazing near its entrance.

The Old Church of St Nicholas stands on top of the hill. This Norman building dates from around 1080AD and consists of a tower, chancel and roofless nave. Nowadays it is cared for by the Churches Conservation Trust and although not complete seems to be in pretty good condition given its exposed aspect.

St Nicholas' Church, Uphill Nature Reserve
Old St Nicholas’ Church, Uphill Hill Nature Reserve

From the church we walked down the steep hill back into the village and turned left towards the coast. I didn’t have a map so we simply followed the path alongside the River Axe, as it flows out into Weston Bay.

View over to Brean Down from Uphill
View over to Brean Down from Uphill

The view out to Brean Down was tantalising; however it’s not possible to access from Uphill. Despite various warning signs we still saw several people on the horizon paddling at the water’s edge. We’ve watched a rescue from the mud further down on Weston beach, why ignore the signs?

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Uphill beach

Uphill beach was very windy, which I guess explains its popularity for beach wind sports. We watched a man zooming up and down in a land yacht (I think, but I’m no expert). Wow, did he go fast.

Drinks on the beach bus, Uphill Slipway Beach
Drinks on the beach bus, Uphill Slipway Beach

Despite the wind we couldn’t resist a drink on top of the double decker cafe bus that’s parked on the beach. We had to hold on tight to our cups and try to ignore the sand blowing into our eyes and hair!

The quiet end of Weston-super-Mare beach
The quiet end of Weston-super-Mare beach

It was a sunny day but this end of the beach was almost deserted. That is until we reached the beach car park. From that point on the crowds walking into Weston thickened, until there was hardly room to move on the pavement.

Walking towards Weston-super-Mare
Walking towards Weston-super-Mare

We walked past the sand sculptures which we’ve visited previously. No time to visit this year! However there’s no way we’d escape Weston-super-Mare without a trip along the pier to feed 2p pieces into the arcade machines. Family tradition also dictates stopping for ice-cream at PJ’s Ice Cream Parlour on the seafront. Highly recommended.

Ice creams in Weston-super-Mare
Ice creams in Weston-super-Mare

We all agreed that this year’s trip had made a great change from our usual day out. Next time we’ll walk north to Sands Bay, returning via the Pier of course!

More info:

  • Find out more about the Uphill Hill Nature Reserve in this leaflet. Access is free.
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A walk from Winchcombe to Belas Knap, Gloucestershire

With a sunny spring day forecast what better way to experience it than with a walk in the Cotswolds. We decided on a 5 mile circular route from Winchcombe via Belas Knap, one of the best preserved long barrows in the area.

Walkers welcome

I hadn’t realised that Winchcombe is the unofficial walking capital of the Cotswolds. It lays claim to more long distance walking routes than any other town, holds its own walking festival and has ‘Walkers are Welcome’ status. Hence there was an abundance of booted middle-aged walkers (er, us) wandering through the town.

Spring lambs, Winchcombe
Spring lambs, Winchcombe

Winchcombe isn’t the Himalayas though, or even the Lake District. Think leisurely afternoon rambles through Cotswold scenery followed by a cream tea instead.

After lunch and a visit to the bakery for mid-walk cake supplies we headed out of town. Our route took us gradually uphill through a field of lambs, probably one of the springiest spring sights. Fortunately they weren’t too bothered by four humans traipsing through their field.

Walk from Winchcombe
Walk from Winchcombe

As we gained height we had a great view back over Sudeley Castle, a private residence which is open to the public. The castle is supposedly haunted by Catherine Parr, the sixth wife of Henry VIII, who is buried in the chapel. Of course, with my cycnical head on this may just be a rumour for the tourists.

Winchcombe walk
Winchcombe walk

Onwards and upwards we walked. Our jumpers were off by now, partly due to the sun’s warmth and not just the exertion. Spring really had arrived! A skylark was singing somewhere above us and gorgeously tactile pussy willow adorned several branches. Ominous small patches of stinging nettles were just starting to grow again too, ready to ambush walkers in the months ahead.

Spring, Winchcombe
Spring, Winchcombe

We passed a small copse with an intriguing building in amongst the trees. Someone’s house? A woodland retreat? A sauna? The Keep Out sign made it clear we wouldn’t be able to investigate.

Belas Knap

As we neared Belas Knap we joined up with the car walkers. The long barrow is sufficiently away from the road that you’ll still face a 15 minute uphill walk even if you do choose to visit by car.

Belas Knap long barrow
Belas Knap long barrow

Belas Knap is a hilltop long barrow estimated to have been built around 3000 BC. The ancient tomb has several burial chambers, including a false entrance. During the 19th Century several excavations uncovered the remains of 31 people, some of whom are thought to originate from the early Bronze Age. You can crawl into and explore a couple of the chambers if you’re brave enough!

The barrow is a popular picnic spot for visitors; slightly surreal given it’s history but I can understand the appeal. There are great views in all directions and the surrounding stone wall offers protection from the wind. It certainly proved a good cake stop.

Heading downhill back to Winchcombe
Heading downhill back to Winchcombe

Back to Winchcombe

Our return to Winchcombe was all downhill. We dropped down quite steeply, past a ménage where a rider was practising dressage, to walk beside a cricket pitch. We were intrigued by the number of stiles punctuating two fences but I can only imagine it was to allow easy access to wayward cricket balls. The last stretch followed the Cotswold Way into town where I was happy to find the tea rooms still open.

We’ll definitely head back to Winchcombe for more walks. In addition to several long distance paths which pass through the town there’s also the remains of a Roman villa, an abbey and a castle to explore locally.

More info

  • We followed the route in our AA Walks in the Cotswolds walks book. Whilst I cannot find the exact route online it’s near enough the one here – but in reverse.
  • I thought parking in Winchcombe was going to be a nightmare as cars were parked on either side of the main road when we first drove through. However we followed signs to the long stay car park which was only a 5 minute walk to the town centre. There were plenty of spaces and it only cost £1!
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Taking the kids to Dismaland, Weston-super-Mare

I’ve never known the train from Bristol to Weston-super-Mare to be as busy as it was last weekend. The usual assortment of day trippers had been replaced by hip twenty-somethings and American tourists; all left standing in the aisles as there were no seats available.

Dismaland
Dismaland

The reason? Banksy’s Dismaland bemusement park on the seafront at Weston. This antithesis of a theme park has opened for 6 weeks on the site of the old Tropicana lido. We didn’t have tickets but I’d heard that on the day tickets were available for those prepared to queue. We arrived just as they were closing the morning queue so the security man suggested we came back later for the afternoon session. That was fine for us as it meant we had time for a trip to PJ’s Ice Cream Parlour, a wander around the pier and lunch.

Get your programmes here! Dismaland
Get your programmes here! Dismaland

We were back queuing at 2.30pm. At 3pm the ticket office opened and a cheer went up. At 4.30pm we got our tickets. The kids were surprisingly good about queuing for so long and I knew the minute I handed the money over that it would be worth the wait. I thanked the ticket attendant and he replied that I wouldn’t be thanking him when we got inside.

Dismaland
Seagull Lady, Banksy, Dismaland

A few minutes later we’d passed through some pretend security and were standing in Dismaland. The exhibition is a mix of fairground attractions with a twist, large model exhibits, films and an indoor art gallery. Over 50 artists have provided works, with Banksy responsible for 11 of the exhibits, including the seagull model above.

Banksy describes Dismaland as a theme park unsuitable for children. My kids loved it, as I’m sure would most teens, but I’d think twice about taking younger children. You’ll spend half of your time explaining the irony behind the exhibits, the other half trying to avoid the liberal use of swearing around the site!

Dismaland
Horse meat carousel, Dismaland

The fairground attractions, which cost extra, included a carousel where a white suited figure is making lasagne from the horses, topple the anvil with a ping pong ball (and win the anvil) and a rotating caravan ride.

I loved the ‘Hook a duck from the muck’ stall. The prizes were inflated plastic bags with a piece of orange fabric in them, modelled to look like goldfish. Not that many people won them! As soon as someone got close to hooking a duck the unsmiling attendant would pick up a duck and throw it at the target, generally resulting in a large splash of water over the person. Or alternatively she’d grab the fishing rod and throw it on the floor.

Big Rig Jig, Dismaland
Big Rig Jig, Mike Ross, Dismaland

The staff, who had responded to an advert for film extras, played their roles perfectly. Unsmiling and disinterested, generally slouching in a corner or getting in the way of photos. I bought a souvenir programme and the attendant literally threw it, and the change at me. It was hard not to laugh.

There is no getting away from the Disney aspect. The staff wear ears which bear a strong resemblance to mouse ears. The entrance wristbands, logo and online advert are unmistakably modelled on Disney. How I’d love to be a fly on the wall in their lawyer’s office!

Dismaland
Outdoor cinema, Dismaland

There’s a cinema showing short films so we bagged some deckchairs and rested our feet. Perhaps we were just watching the wrong film but I found this part the weakest of the show. Wandering off after a few minutes we discovered a giant toilet roll sculpture and a killer whale jumping out of a toilet (the former by Michael Beitz, the latter a Banksy).

Dismaland
Dismaland

I loved the way the original lido had been incorporated into the exhibition. Although I am assuming that the crumbling stonework, uneven flooring and weeds weren’t added recently for effect!

The police riot van below was built for use in Northern Ireland but now stands in the middle of a lake adorned with a slide and fountain.

Dismaland
Police van, Banksy, Dismaland

We entered the burnt out castle and found a dead Cinderella falling out of her pumpkin carriage surrounded by paparazzi. This piece is probably one of the most controversial given the obvious similarities to the death of Princess Diana. The other exhibit to stir up emotions is that of the boat pond where visitors can control the crowded boats full of migrants. Bad taste? Certainly thought provoking.

Dismaland
Mini Gulf, Dismaland

We passed on the opportunity to play Mini Gulf but enjoyed checking out the variety of obstacles. There’s a huge sandcastle and windmill next to the children’s play area and pocket money loans shop. Not many takers for the 5000% interest rate!

Dismaland
Dismaland

There was a short queue of people waiting to take selfies at the selfie hole (oh the irony). I’d read a couple of reviews slating the queues inside Dismaland, all part of the experience I’m sure, but we were lucky and whilst a couple of exhibits had queues most of them didn’t. It actually felt relatively empty which was rather surprising given the long wait outside.

Dismaland
Selfie hole, Dismaland

The three large art galleries were excellent. We watched a Banksy offering, the grim reaper riding the dodgems to the soundtrack of the Bee Gees Stayin’ Alive.

There are a couple of Damien Hirst pieces including a unicorn preserved in formaldehyde but one of my favourites was Promise by Caroline McCarthy. This consisted of plastic plant pots and ready meal packaging with garnishes cut into the cardboard to suggest freshness.

Promise, Caroline McCarthy, Dismaland
Promise, Caroline McCarthy, Dismaland

The galleries were a fascinating mix of sculptures, paintings and objects. One gallery was dominated by a mushroom cloud tree house. The Spanish artist Paco Pomet had inserted the Cookie Monster into a picture of war lords driving a jeep. Whilst Jessica Harrison had porcelain figurines with tattoos. I’d love to have such creative thoughts.

Readers of a certain age will remember Jimmy Cauty, one half of the group KLF, and the man who burnt a million dollars. His contribution to Dismaland is a huge sculpture which initially looks like a large model railway set. Look closer and you’ll find almost 3000 model police figures in a post-apocalyptic world. The strobe lighting and staff shouting ‘Move along, there’s nothing to see’ are incredibly atmospheric.

Dismaland
Dismaland

The exit sign was exactly as I’d expect of a Banksy exhibition. Dismaland delivered everything I’d hoped for and more. Given the number of people visiting Weston for the attraction I really hope it’s delivered a great boost to the late summer tourist trade too!  

More info:

  • Dismaland was only open until 27 September 2015 and has now closed.
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Campsite review: Denfurlong Farm campsite, near Chedworth, Gloucs

I was in two minds whether to write a review of Denfurlong Farm campsite or not. Partly because it’s a simple set up so there’s not really much to say about it. And partly because it’s our new favourite campsite which I’m not sure I want anyone else to discover!

Location

Denfurlong Farm campsite is on the outskirts of Chedworth village in Gloucestershire. It’s the perfect location for discovering the local Cotswold villages and countryside. Cirencester is a 15 minute drive south of the campsite whilst the tourist destinations of Northleach and Bibury can be reached in the same time.

Denfurlong Farm campsite on a sunny June weekend
Denfurlong Farm campsite on a sunny June weekend

We stayed over a gorgeous sunny weekend in June. There were only about 10 other people on the site, I couldn’t believe how quiet it was given the location.

Facilities

This is not the place to visit if you expect extensive facilities. There’s a field, one Portaloo and basic shower, a water tap and waste disposal. There are a small number of electric hook ups for caravans but it’s not your typical caravan site.

Toilet and shower facilities, Denfurlong Farm campsite
Toilet and shower facilities, Denfurlong Farm campsite

New toilet and shower facilities are underway; we had a peek and it looks like they’ll be a big improvement when they’re finished. Although I’m a little worried the campsite will become too popular when the facilities open!

*Update August 2015* – the new toilet block is now open!

The new toilet block at Denfurlong Campsite
The new toilet block at Denfurlong Campsite

The campsite has loads of space for children and dogs to play. Our kids enjoyed playing on the rope swing and exploring the area up behind the tents. There’s a communal campfire pit in the middle of the field which we didn’t get a chance to use but would be perfect for toasting marshmallows. If you do plan to cook you can hire cool boxes and barbecues from the farm shop.

Denfurlong Farm campsite rope swing
Denfurlong Farm campsite rope swing

There are a couple of bell tents to hire too. They look quite roomy inside and can be hired with or without equipment. I always enjoy staying in my own tent but these would be handy if you don’t want the hassle of putting up a tent.

Cotswold Hills Bell Tents, Denfurlong Farm campsite
Cotswold Hills Bell Tents, Denfurlong Farm campsite

Chedworth Farm shop

Aside from the location, the main reason I chose this site was because of the farm shop cafe which is only a couple of minutes walk away.

The cafe is open on weekend mornings for bottomless fried breakfasts (£7), unlimited coffee (£2) and plenty of other breakfast choices. The kids had a smaller fried breakfast for £4.50 each but it was still pretty big!

Kids breakfast, Chedworth Farm Shop cafe
Kids breakfast, Chedworth Farm Shop cafe

The farm makes its own ice cream so we felt obliged to test this too. The lemon meringue flavour was the favourite from our choices although all were good. I didn’t get around to eating any cakes but they also looked tempting.

The only downside was that the cafe had a ‘fried smell’ about it. It wasn’t really obvious once you were sitting inside but was a little off-putting when you first walk into the farm shop area.

Things to do nearby

Corinium Museum in nearby Cirencester is a great place to learn about the Roman history of the area. The museum contains locally found mosaics and wall paintings, along with plenty of Roman artefacts and information.

Corinium museum mural, Cirencester
Corinium museum mural, Cirencester

The ruins of Chedworth Roman Villa are around 3 miles away from the campsite. It’s one of the largest Romano-British villas in the country and well worth a visit. Keep an eye out for large snails around the site; their ancestors were brought over by the Romans to be fattened on milk and eaten as a delicacy.

Chedworth Roman Villa
Chedworth Roman Villa

We’ve been to the villa before so didn’t visit this time. Instead we went for a walk in Chedworth Woods and Nature Reserve and then made use of the National Trust cafe and toilets at the villa.

Summary

We loved this Cotswold campsite and are already planning our return. We are back to basics campers so don’t mind the lack of facilities but it won’t suit everyone. For us though it is the perfect place to spend a night or two in the Cotswolds.

More info:

  • We paid £10 for our grass pitch, this included 2 adults and 2 children. Prices increase slightly during July and August but are still a bargain for the area. Further details and booking information can be found on the Denfurlong Farm campsite website.
  • Corinium Museum in Cirencester is open from 10am-5pm Monday to Saturday and 2pm-5pm on Sundays in the summer months. Different opening times apply out of season. An adult ticket costs £4.95, children age 5-16 cost £2.45.
  • Chedworth Roman Villa is open 10am-5pm during the summer months. Entry is free to National Trust members, alternatively a family ticket costs £22.50. Check the website before visiting out of season.
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