View from Lydeard Hill, Quantock Hills

Four family walks in the Quantock Hills, Somerset

The only good thing, from my perspective, about our impending winter is that it gives me a chance to catch up on blog posts. Take our trip to the Quantock Hills for example. We visited in late summer, the August Bank Holiday weekend to be exact. Remembering the weekend we spent walking the hills, eating cream teas and searching for fossils cheers me up no end on a wet and grey November day.

Located in north Somerset, the Quantock Hills cover an area of 38 square miles. They’re less well known than their nearby neighbour, Exmoor, but on a Bank Holiday weekend that’s a bonus. As usual we chose to explore on foot, walking along the coast, through heather moorland and wooded combes. We squeezed in four short walks, not too strenuous and all less than 4 miles so perfect for families.

1. Kilve beach and East Quantoxhead

Whilst some people enjoy golden sand and blue seas I prefer interesting beaches. Give me rockpools, fossils and shells any day. Kilve beach ticked these boxes. Whilst it isn’t the most beautiful to look at, particularly on a grey murky morning, it’s a fantastic place for fossil hunting.

Rock strata, Kilve beach
Rock strata, Kilve beach

The cliffs at Kilve beach are formed from oil rich shale, with the different layers of rock clearly visible. Back in the 1920s, plans were afoot to extract the oil but fortunately proved unprofitable. I hope it remains this way.

We spent a good hour mooching around the beach, turning over the rocks in our search for fossils. We found plenty but what impressed me most were the huge ammonite fossils; it’s incredible to think these are 200 million years old!

Ammonite on Kilve beach, Somerset
Ammonite on Kilve beach, Somerset

The kids were disappointed to leave the beach and go on a walk; they wanted to carry on fossil hunting. Tearing ourselves away we headed up onto the cliff to continue our walk along the coast path. All around us were the gifts of late summer; blackberries, golden fields and swallows.

View from Kilve beach walk
View from Kilve beach walk

Turning inland we passed through the tiny village of East Quantoxhead with its manor house, duck pond and mill house.

As we neared the end of the walk a small ford offered some fun. We all had a go jumping over the stream; much more exciting than walking across the bridge.

No need for the bridge! Jumping the ford near Kilve
No need for the bridge! Jumping the ford near Kilve

It was a fortunate coincidence that our walk ended back at Chantry Tea Gardens. How on earth did that happen?! Sitting outside in the sun we enjoyed sandwiches and a cream tea, accompanied by a cheeky robin demanding crumbs.

2. Beacon Hill

Our second day started wet. The forecast was an improving one so after a lazy morning we headed to Beacon Hill. The rain wasn’t quite done with us so we lingered in the car park waiting for the showers to pass.

View from Beacon Hill - between rain showers
View from Beacon Hill – between rain showers

I’d originally planned a longer walk but decided a quick trip up to Beacon Hill summit would be drier. It didn’t take too long to climb and from the top we had great views in all directions. Of rain clouds that appeared to be heading towards us. We didn’t stop to admire the views! Straight back down to the car. Just before the rain arrived, again.

3. Lydeard Hill and Wills Neck

Fortunately the weather cheered up as the day progressed. Aside from the threat of one further heavy shower where we decided to take refuge in a house offering cream teas. Two cream teas in two days, yum.

Heather path up to Wills Neck, Quantock Hills
Heather path up to Wills Neck, Quantock Hills

Our afternoon walk took us onto the highest point of the Quantocks, Wills Neck. This was another straightforward out and back route, up and down a hill; good job really as I didn’t have a map. From the car park we walked to the left of Lydeard Hill, down into a small plantation and up again.

The colours of the Quantocks really are stunning in late summer. The pink and purple heathers and the yellows of the gorse. At least I think it was gorse; the problem with writing a post three months after a visit is that I cannot see from my photos whether there are prickles on the bush (and is therefore gorse) or not (and is therefore broom). Either way, it’s beautiful.

View from Lydeard Hill, Quantock Hills
View from Lydeard Hill, Quantock Hills

4. Holford Combe and Woodland Hill

This was my favourite walk. The weather, in contrast to the previous day, was warm and sunny. Perfect for sitting on the M5 looking at the back of car bumpers queuing for miles. But I’ve jumped ahead to the afternoon. Our morning was idyllic.

The first part of our walk took us through Holford Combe, a steeply wooded valley. I was surprised to learn the video for the Bryan Adams song, Everything I do (I do it for you), was filmed around here. Back in 1991 it was number one for a gazillion weeks so in the interests of blog research I watched the video again. After the initial shock of how young Bryan Adams looked I could immediately spot Holford Silk Mills. Sadly not passed on this walk, but Kilve beach features too.

Crossing Holford Combe stream
Crossing Holford Combe stream

Two hundred years before Bryan some very different wordsmiths, the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Dorothy and William Wordsworth lived and wrote in these hills. As our track opened out into a sunlit glade it was easy to see where they got their inspiration. The stream sparkled in the sunlight and I could easily imagine whiling away afternoons relaxing on the grassy bank. It was magical; if  I believed in pixies this is where they’d live!

On top of Woodland Hill, Quantock Hills
On top of Woodland Hill, Quantock Hills

We followed the stream until it reached Ladies Combe then headed out of the woodland up a steep track onto Woodland Hill. Along the familiar heather and gorse covered slopes to the top of the hill. There are fabulous views from the summit, if you exclude Hinkley Point nuclear power station (far right in the picture above) from your field of vision.

Descending Woodland Hill, Quantock Hills
Descending Woodland Hill, Quantock Hills

Walking back to the car park we found a large muddy pond teeming with tadpoles. I know very little about the frog breeding cycle but it seemed very late in the season. Indeed, as I sit here on this November night I start to wonder what happened to them. I do hope they reached frog-hood!

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10 thoughts on “Four family walks in the Quantock Hills, Somerset”

  1. I absolutely adore Somerset, we spent autumn half term there last year and it was of my favourite holidays. My eldest would have to be dragged screaming from fossil hunting.

  2. Thanks for sharing these lovely walks Christine. The ammonite fossil is amazing! I also love the heather. I have a soft spot for that blanket of purple covering the hills. Thanks for sharing with us on #FarawayFiles

  3. Hi Christine, Kilve beach looks a lovely place to poke around on, to think that there is still evidence of something that was around two hundred million years ago is quite mind blowing.

    The grey skies really enhance the pinks and purples of the heather and the view from Beacon hill is quite something….

    I can’t believe you don’t believe in Pixies! Pixies Holt used to be full of them!

    xx

  4. I loved reading this post, Christine. I know east Somerset really well but have never been to the Quantocks. Having read through this I can’t wait to add them to my list – it reminds me a bit of the Ashdown Forest which is near where I live, but has the added attraction of beaches with fossils as well. Absolutely wonderful – can’t wait to visit. Thanks for sharing this with us on #Farawayfiles

  5. I am like “ohhh” and “ahh” while reading your descriptions and seeing your photos. I like blue seas too (after all, I am from the Caribbean) but I have gotten used to wild and rocky beaches (since I moved to California). Glad you are catching on posts since it looks like you visit really nice places.

  6. Beacon Hills looks just stunning and somewhere I would love to take my camera, a flask of coffee and a good book. But I know the boys would love the fossils on a beach, in fact I think I would struggle dragging Joe away. Thanks so much for linking up #MondayEscapes

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