10 things to do with your family in Côtes-d’Armor, Brittany

Are you thinking of a family holiday to Brittany? We stayed for a week in the Côtes-d’Armor department and discovered just how much there is to see and do in Brittany. Read on to find out our top ten suggestions for a family trip.

1. Visit the Pink Granite Coast, near Ploumanac’h

The Pink Granite Coast is one of Brittany’s premier tourist attractions. The coastal walk, which follows a former coastguard footpath, from Perros-Guirec is very popular and a great introduction to the pink rocks.

Pink granite coast, near Perros-Guirec
Pink granite coast, near Perros-Guirec

Many of the formations are named after the shapes they resemble, including a rabbit and a witch. I’ve no idea if the large rock below the lighthouse in the photograph is an ‘official shape’ but it looks like a sideways face to me!

2. Eat a crepe

It would be hard to come to Brittany and miss out on crepes. There are creperies everywhere, with traditional lemon and sugar fillings plus the ever popular Nutella option.

Crepes, Guingamp market, Brittany
Crepes, Guingamp market, Brittany

My favourite was a takeaway from a market stall eaten on a rainy morning. We ate posher crepes, with knives and forks, but nothing surpassed the simple joy of eating a crepe, oozing warm chocolate spread, direct from a paper bag.

3. Chateau de Tonquédec, Tonquédec

This is possibly my favourite castle in France. Built in the 15th Century, it is still owned by descendants of the original family. If you like your castles intact and perfectly restored this is not for you; it’s definitely a work in progress.

Château de Tonquédec, Côtes d'Armor
Château de Tonquédec, Côtes d’Armor

There are lots of interesting areas to explore; dark stairways to venture down (if you’re brave!) and towers to climb. Children will love it but do keep an eye on them as some parts resemble a medieval building site. Watch out for the local goats too; on our visit they were sitting high up on top of one of the walls.

Château de Tonquédec, Brittany
Château de Tonquédec, Brittany

4. Hisse et ho, Plelo

My kids loved this! Think of giant nets suspended from trees, rather like a cross between Go Ape and a trampoline park. There are slides, balls and hoops and bouncy nets to jump around on. Definitely a place to wear off some energy.

Hisse et ho! Char à bancs, Brittany
Hisse et ho! Char à bancs, Brittany

It’s not just for kids either. I enjoyed it too although the bounciness made me feel travel sick after a while. I was happier sitting and watching from the picnic table.

5. Watch the waves at Site du Gouffre, Plougrescant

Coastline, Le Gouffre, Brittany
Coastline, Le Gouffre, Brittany

The peninsula is probably most famous for Castel Meur, a house situated between two huge granite rocks, which features on postcards and tourist literature across the region. However, I enjoyed walking the coastline and watching the waves force water through the nearby gouffre. Although relatively peaceful during our visit the power of the waves was very evident. I’d love to return on a stormy day.

6. Centre de Découverte du Son, Cavan

The Sound Discovery Centre may sound a tad boring but it’s the complete opposite. It’s a quirky and unique attraction, which I highly recommend. Visitors follow a trail through the woodland where musical instruments are ingeniously incorporated into the surroundings. There are strings to strum, drums to tap and plenty of tubes to blow (mouthpieces provided).

Sound Discovery Centre, Cavan, Brittany
Sound Discovery Centre, Cavan, Brittany

After the woodland trail there’s a garden designed in the shape of the ear, along with a few more sounds to discover. The whole place is cleverly put together and great fun for all ages.

7. La Vallee des Saints, Carnoët

If, like me, you have an (unrealistic) yearning to visit Easter Island then a trip to the Valley of the Saints might just suffice. Perched on a hill there are currently more than 60 granite statues dedicated to Breton saints.

Valley of the Saints, Carnoët, Brittany
Valley of the Saints, Carnoët, Brittany

Visitors are free to wander around the saints, all of which are funded by donations from local communities and organisations. Over the next 50 years the project aims to create 1000 statues; a definite Easter Island contender.

8. Abbaye de Beauport, Paimpol

Founded in 1202 Abbaye de Beauport was once a centre of monastic life but in recent years the buildings have housed apartments, schools and a farm. Although parts of the abbey have been restored I preferred the atmospheric ruins. Pink and purple hydrangeas brightened up the grey stone walls. Very photogenic.

Abbaye de Beauport, near Paimpol, Brittany
Abbaye de Beauport, near Paimpol, Brittany

There’s plenty of information available in English, including a discovery trail leaflet and multi-lingual information boards. There are grounds to explore too, including a walled orchard and marshy coastline.

9. Explore Dinan

We arrived in St Malo on the overnight ferry and had a few hours to fill before our campsite was available. A visit to the medieval town of Dinan, with its half timbered houses and extensive ramparts, proved the perfect stopover.

Dinan
Dinan

We spent most of our time wandering through the picturesque lanes and browsing the shops. However, we exerted ourselves a little climbing to the top of the clock tower for a view over the roof tops.

Dinan, Brittany
Dinan, Brittany

I’m glad we managed to get some exercise as Dinan is also notable for providing our first, and best, taste of  Kouign-amman. This heavenly Breton cake consists of 30% sugar and 30% butter so I’m rather glad it’s not readily available in the UK!

10. Île de Bréhat

Having holidayed in Guernsey and Jersey I was keen to visit Île de Bréhat which is marketed as the French Channel Island. The island is just a mile off the Brittany coast, but after a ten minute ferry ride you feel miles from anywhere.

Île de Bréhat consists of two main islands. Both are car free so visitors either walk or hire bikes to see the islands. We chose to walk which I think was the best option to access the more remote beaches. Although it was a rather warm day for too much strenuous activity!

Île de Bréhat, Brittany
Île de Bréhat, Brittany

The island is incredibly beautiful although in August it was also incredibly busy. I felt rather sorry for the locals but I guess they also rely on the summer tourist invasion.

Have you visited Brittany? Where else would you suggest visiting?

More info:

  • Chateau de Tonquédec costs 5 euros for adults, 2.5 euros for children. It is open daily at varying times from April to September, and weekends only in October.
  • Hisse et Ho is open daily in July and August and weekends from March to November. Adults cost 12 euros, children cost 10 euros.
  • The Sound Discovery Centre is open 1-7pm from March to November, every day during the French school holidays. Entrance costs 7 euros for adults, 3.5 euros for children.
  • Boats to Île de Bréhat depart from Pointe de L’Arcouest, near Ploubazlanec. The return journey costs 10 euros for adults and 8.50 euros for children aged 4-11 years. From April to September boats generally depart every hour, there is a less frequent service from October to March. Futher details from Vedettes de Bréhat.
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What to do on a weekend break in Lille, France

Last autumn my daughter and I found ourselves with a spare weekend whilst the other half of the family were off watching rugby. But what to do? After much checking of Trip Advisor and prices I eventually decided on a weekend break to Lille, via the Eurostar.

Lille: what did we see?

We unknowingly co-ordinated our visit with Journées du Patrimoine (similar to heritage open days in the UK) so the majority of tourist attractions were open and free. This meant we visited more attractions than I would normally recommend squeezing into a couple of days.

Vieux-ville (old town)

We spent most of our time exploring the cobbled streets of the old town. It’s home to the Musee de l’Hospice Comtesse, the birthplace of Charles de Gaulle and the best patisserie in Lille.

Vieux-Lille
Vieux-Lille

It’s a great place to wander and browse, soaking up the atmosphere and admiring the architecture. There are plenty of (pricey) independent shops to discover and cafes to stop for a coffee in.

Église Saint- Maurice de Lille
Église Saint- Maurice de Lille

Most shops are closed on Sunday so it’s best to visit the old town on a weekday. This includes the large Carrefour near the railway station!

Musée de l’Hospice Comtesse

This is a former hospice in the old town, originally founded in 1237 to care for the poor. The gound floor is a reconstructed Flemish house. Upstairs we found art, wooden sculptures and a couple of large globes. My favourite room was the kitchen as it was decorated in individually hand-painted blue and white tiles.

Musée de l'Hospice Comtesse
Musée de l’Hospice Comtesse

Outside we admired the buildings from the courtyard and wandered around the medicinal herb garden. There’s a chapel on site too but this looked closed. I hadn’t originally planned to visit the hospice so we only popped in for a quick look; if you have time to spare there is an English audio guide.

La Maison Natale Charles de Gaulle

This house is the birthplace of former president Charles de Gaulle. The house belonged to his grandparents and has plenty of his childhood mementoes.

Le Musee de la Maison Natale de Charles de Gaulle
Le Musee de la Maison Natale de Charles de Gaulle

We joined a 40 minute tour in French. Fortunately my daughter was given an English leaflet as I only understood about one word in five.

Place du Général de Gaulle (Grand Place)

The Grand Place is Lille’s main square and is full of Flemish style buildings, including the old Stock Exchange.

Place du General De Gaulle, Lille
Place du General De Gaulle, Lille

It’s a good place to sit and people watch as there are plenty of pavement cafes and restaurants. We bought pizza slices for lunch and ate them sitting beside the fountain.

Sound and light show, Lille
Sound and light show, Lille

We came back later that evening for a special sound and light show, one of the free events that formed part of the Journées du Patrimoine weekend. The light show was projected onto the theatre and was made up of a series of short films with impressive lighting effects. It reminded me of the illuminations on Buckingham Palace during the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee concert (although Madness didn’t appear!).

Vieille Bourse (Old Stock Exchange)

Old Stock Exchange, Lille
Old Stock Exchange, Lille

The Vieille Bourse is a Flemish style building in the Grand Place. It consists of 24 identical houses built around a courtyard. Nowadays this houses stalls selling old books, posters and records. On Sunday evenings it hosts the Lille tango club; that would be great to see!

Ronde des géants (giants’ parade)

Parade of giants, Place du Theatre, Lille
Parade of giants, Place du Theatre, Lille

This was the unexpected highlight of our visit to Lille. There’s nothing better than arriving somewhere and realising you’ve actually managed to coincide your visit with a local event.

La Ronde des géants, Lille
La Ronde des géants, Lille

The giants appear in carnivals and processions in many towns throughout this part of northern France. Dating back more than 600 years each town keeps up the tradition, maintaining and displaying their own giants. The structures are built on huge wickerwork frames and rolled and danced through the streets, accompanied by bands.

Parade of the giants, Lille
Parade of the giants, Lille

Wazemmes market

Locals head to the market at Wazemmes on Sunday. I’d heard it was very crowded so we left our hotel early. After a quick trip on the Metro we discovered we were way too early as most of the stallholders were still setting up.

Wazemmes market, Lille
Wazemmes market, Lille

Undeterred we wandered around the cafes that surround the square and chose one populated by stallholders. Despite mistakenly ordering café crème rather than café au lait it was the best coffee and pain au chocolat ever!

The market itself wasn’t so good. Although the fruit and vegetable stalls looked good there didn’t seem to be much local produce. Most of the market consisted of the typical stalls you find everywhere; clothes, household goods and cheap toys. However my teenage daughter really enjoyed it and bought food presents for most of the family.

Parc zoologique (Lille Zoo)

My daughter was keen to visit Lille Zoo and although I had my reservations I was pleasantly surprised. The collection is quite small but the enclosures are large and well maintained.

Lille Zoo
Lille Zoo

We loved watching the red panda and the entertaining meerkats. There’s also a tropical house with snakes, marmosets and tortoise and a couple of larger areas housing zebras, rhino and tapir.

The zoo is located in a large park, about 20 minutes walk from the old town. The park is also home to the Citadel but this is usually out of bounds to casual visitors as it houses some of NATO’s Rapid Reaction Corps!

Beffroi de Lille (Lille belfry)

I enjoy panoramic view of cities and always seek out a tower to climb. In Lille this is the town hall belfry.

Lille belfry
Lille belfry

As we visited on a free entrance day there were a lot of people waiting to go up. After queuing outside we climbed 109 stairs to a small shop and registration desk where we had to queue again for the lift. We eventually reached the top but our visit was rather rushed and we didn’t fully appreciate it.

Patisserie

Not a tourist attraction but definitely a Lille highlight was sampling the local patisserie. Our weekend treat was a trip to sample the sweet concoctions at Meert restaurant. It wasn’t cheap, and it was incredibly hard to make a decision, but we eventually chose and shared an amazing chocolate tart.

Aux Merveilleux
Aux Merveilleux

However, Aux Merveilleux de Fred was almost as good and much cheaper.  We watched the merveilleux being made (meringues sandwiched together with whipped cream and rolled in chocolate) and then joined the queue of people stretching out of the bakery. A few minutes later we sampled the merveilleux; they literally melt in your mouth so cannot possibly contain any calories!

Lille: our accommodation – Hotel de la Paix

We stayed at Hotel de la Paix, a small Art Nouveau hotel. We chose it for its excellent location, about 10 minutes walk from the railway station and less than 5 minutes to the main squares and old town.

Hotel de laPaix
Hotel de la Paix

Our room was on the third floor and was quiet and clean, with colourful decoration. It won’t appeal to all tastes but I enjoy places with character. The wifi was hit and miss in the room but worked well in the communal areas. There is a small breakfast area where we ate the first morning but it was much cheaper in local cafes.

Lille: getting there and getting around

I couldn’t believe how quick and easy it was to reach Lille via the Eurostar. It took less than 1.5 hours from London St Pancras; quicker than visiting many cities in the UK. The only slight stress was arriving in a new city late at night and having to walk past groups of people who tend to congregate near railway stations the world over.

The main attractions of Lille are easily walkable but you’ll probably want to use the Metro if you visit Wazemme. The Metro is straightforward to use and if travelling 3 stops or less you can buy a zip ticket which is cheaper. Remember to validate your ticket in the machines before you board.

Lille: the verdict

Although there were no amazing ‘must see’ sights we easily filled our weekend. We started out early on both days but still missed out several museums so there’s more than enough to see on a short break.

There were a couple of negatives. Dog owners don’t appear to worry about picking up after their pets. We also noticed groups of beggars, generally children, working the outdoor cafes around Grand Place asking diners for money. But overall we loved Lille and highly recommend it for a city break.

More info

  • The Lille tourism website has full details of opening hours and costs for all attractions.
  • You can pick up a schedule of giant appearances from tourist offices in northern France, further details available from the La Ronde des Géants website (in French, but Google can translate it).
  • We booked our hotel via a well known hotel booking website as it offered better deals than going direct. The Hotel de la Paix website currently shows a rate of €98 per night for a double room.
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How to spend a day in Le Puy-en-Velay, Haute-Loire, France

It has taken a while to write but this is my final post about our holiday in the Haute-Loire region of central France. I’ve already reviewed our CosyCamp lodgings and written a round up of Things to do in the Haute-Loire but felt the town of Le Puy deserved a post of its own.

View from Rocher Saint-Michel d’Aiguilhe
View from Rocher Saint-Michel d’Aiguilhe

Le Puy-en-Velay is the most popular tourist destination in the Haute-Loire; it’s enjoyably busy rather than overrun with visitors. The town is famous for lace, Le Puy lentils and its rather unique geography. Situated in a caldera the main tourist sites sit atop volcanic plugs and tower over the surrounding streets. So what did we see?

Le Puy-en-Velay market

We visited on Saturday which is market day. The produce stalls were full of cheeses to sample, giant bulbs of garlic, weird and wonderful mushrooms as well as fresh fruit and vegetables. There was even a stall selling live rabbits and chickens. I assumed these were for the pot but a young girl appeared to be buying one as a pet so perhaps not.

Le Puy-en-Velay market
Le Puy-en-Velay market

You can guess which stall was my daughter’s favourite though……

The best thing about Le Puy market!
The best thing about Le Puy market!

Cathédrale Notre Dame du Puy

After the market we tackled our first steps of the day and walked up to the Roman Catholic cathedral. Le Puy is the starting point for the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compestela and pilgrims gather at the cathedral each morning to be blessed.

Steps to the Cathédrale Notre Dame du Puy
Steps to the Cathédrale Notre Dame du Puy

The striped facade makes for an impressive entrance but I found the inside pretty austere.

Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Le Puy-en-Velay
Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Le Puy-en-Velay

Statue of Notre-Dame de France

From the cathedral it’s a 10 minute walk, up more steps, to the statue of Notre-Dame de France. This pink statue has an impressive history; it was built from melted down cannons seized during the Siege of Sevastapol.

Statue Notre-Dame de France, Le Puy-en-Velay
Statue Notre-Dame de France, Le Puy-en-Velay

You can walk up a spiral staircase inside the statue and peek out through the top. The final part is up a narrow ladder. Be prepared to queue as only one person can go up and down at a time.

View from Statue Notre-Dame de France
View from Statue Notre-Dame de France

Even if you don’t fancy climbing inside the statue there are impressive views from the surrounding grounds. You can look down over the terracotta rooftops and across to the cathedral.

Steps down from statue of Notre-Dame, Le Puy
Steps down from statue of Notre-Dame, Le Puy

Rocher et chapelle Saint-Michel D’Aiguilhe

Our final visit of the day was to the chapel of St Michel. This was built over 1000 years ago when men thought it was possible to get closer to gods by putting places of worship on top of rocks. For modern day visitors this means yet more steps, 268 to be exact, which wind up around the rock.

Chapelle Saint-Michel, Le Puy-en-Velay
Chapelle Saint-Michel, Le Puy-en-Velay

My son decided he’d had enough walking at this point, fortunately there are several benches to sit and rest on as you climb the rock.

Rest stop in Le Puy
Rest stop in Le Puy

It’s definitely worth making the effort as there are yet more great views and an atmospheric chapel to explore on the summit. Inside we found stone arches, ceilings adorned with frescoes and stained glass windows.

Inside the Chapelle Saint-Michel D'Aiguilhe
Inside the Chapelle Saint-Michel D’Aiguilhe

If you have walking difficulties or young children you’ll find it hard to negotiate all the steps. An alternative option is to make use of Le Petit Train, a tourist train which takes you on a 45 minute circuit of the major sights.

As we headed back into town, past the tourist lace shops, we came across a wedding party in the Place du Clauzel. There were some impressive ‘Just Married’ decorations on the back of the wedding car.

Just married
Just married

We had a great day out in Le Puy and definitely recommend a visit, just remember to wear a good pair of walking shoes!

More info:

  • It’s relatively easy to find your way around the main attractions but it’s worth picking up a free map from the tourist office. Alternatively you can download one here.
  • We drove to Le Puy from our campsite. We found a parking spot pretty easily in the Place du Breuil; pay at the ticket machine when you leave.
  • The Cathédrale Notre Dame du Puy is open daily and free to visitors.
  • You can see the statue of Notre-Dame de France from many places across town but if you wish to visit there’s a charge of 4 euros for adults, 2 euros for children. It’s open from mid-February to mid-November.
  • Adult entrance to Rocher Saint-Michel D’Aiguilhe costs 3.50 euros, children aged between 6-18 years pay 2 euros. It’s open from February-mid November; check the website for opening hours as these vary according to season.
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