Exploring the northern Gower Peninsula, Swansea

Think of the Gower peninsula and you probably imagine holidaymakers enjoying its golden sandy beaches. But whilst the area is home to some of the most celebrated beaches in Wales, spare a thought for its quiet northern neighbour. On a recent trip we left the busier southern beaches behind and spent a day discovering just how different the northern Gower is.

Continue reading Exploring the northern Gower Peninsula, Swansea

Our holiday explorations in and around Ardnamurchan, Lochaber

I almost don’t want to publish this blog post. After spending four amazing days in the Ardnamurchan area I am hesitant to recommend it for fear of it becoming too busy. But, as my favourite part of our Scotland holiday how can I not write about it?
Continue reading Our holiday explorations in and around Ardnamurchan, Lochaber

10 things our family enjoyed on the Isle of Anglesey

We recently completed another item on my UK bucket list and spent a week on Anglesey in North Wales.

Anglesey is the largest island in Wales and has plenty of tourist attractions for all ages. Read on to find out what we enjoyed most about the island.

Continue reading 10 things our family enjoyed on the Isle of Anglesey

Sunset watching at Newborough beach and Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey

When a beach is the number one Trip Advisor attraction on Anglesey you know it’s going to be special. You also expect it to be overrun with people. And perhaps, on a sunny summer day, Newborough beach and Llanddwyn Island are. But visit on a cool spring evening and you might well have the sweep of golden sand to yourself.

The car park at Newborough Forest is huge. Presumably testament to the number of day visitors who come to enjoy the beach, search for red squirrels and cycle the woodland tracks. There are toilets, marked trails and an ice-cream van in high season. But, aside from a couple of cars and campervans, it was almost empty at 8pm.

Watching the sunset from Llanddwyn island
Watching the sunset from Llanddwyn island

We parked and climbed the dunes to the beach. A perfect crescent of sand greeted us. Oystercatchers calling out. And a huge dead fish down on the shoreline that had both kids poking it in excitement.

Our target was Llanddwyn island, a mile or so along the sand from the car park. The island is cut off at high tide so check tide tables before you visit. Unless you fancy being marooned.

Beach walk out to Llanddwyn island
Beach walk out to Llanddwyn island

As we reached the island the clouds parted and a few rays of sun broke through. We were treated to the magical golden glow you get just before the sun sets.

Walk out to Llanddwyn island, Anglesey
Walk out to Llanddwyn island, Anglesey

Tŵr Mawr lighthouse, Llanddwyn island

For such a small finger of land Llanddwyn Island, named after St Dwynwen, the Welsh patron saint of lovers, has more than its fair share of things to see. Away from the beaches there are historic lighthouses, the remains of a church, crosses and a terrace of houses once used by pilots guiding ships into the Menai Straits.

Tŵr Mawr lighthouse on Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey
Tŵr Mawr lighthouse on Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey

I thought we were the only ones on Llanddwyn. Until I realised I was about to walk into a photo shoot. Several professional looking photographers had set up their tripods and cameras to record the perfect sunset shot. Feeling guilty about spoiling their photos I decided not to visit Tŵr Mawr lighthouse. Instead I joined them on the rocks to bag a shot of my own.

After the sunset, Llanddwyn
After the sunset, Llanddwyn

Leaving the island we raced the darkening skies back to our car. As we drove home through the woods we scared the kids with tales of mutant giant squirrels attacking the car. They’re old enough for a few scary stories. But it was funny how they both locked their passenger doors!

Newborough beach

Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey
Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey

Our second sunset visit was unplanned. We’d set off on an after dinner walk to a different stretch of beach. All started well until I climbed a sand dune expecting to see the sea. The water was a good mile away, separated by rolling sand dunes. Realising we wouldn’t reach the beach for sunset we turned around and retreated to the car.

Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey
Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey

Undeterred we drove on to Newborough beach, arriving just as the sun dipped behind the trees. There was no time to walk far from the car park. Once again the tide was out. But this time so was the sun. It was stunning.

View over to the mainland from Newborough beach, Anglesey
View over to the mainland from Newborough beach, Anglesey

Over on the mainland the sky above the mountains of Snowdonia and the Lleyn Peninsula turned pink. Inspired by this view we headed there later in the week to climb Yr Eifl, the hill on the right in the picture above.

Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey
Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey

Returning my gaze to Anglesey I watched the most incredible sunset. As the sun sank below the horizon the clouds turned from yellow to orange to red. The colours reflecting in the pools left by the retreating tide.

Brent geese flying from Newborough beach
Brent geese flying from Newborough beach

With impeccable timing a flock of Brent geese flew up from the shoreline, silhouetted against the orange sky. I couldn’t have  imagined a more perfect ending to the day.

Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey
Newborough beach sunset, Anglesey

Another five minutes and the colours were gone. It was time for us to leave.

We didn’t return to Newborough beach again; there was no need. I’ll remember this sunset for the rest of my life. And if you’re looking for the best sunset in Anglesey, perhaps even Wales, you should visit too!

If you’d like to find out what else we enjoyed on the island more pop over to 10 things to do on the Isle of Anglesey.

More info:

  • Newborough Nature Reserve is on the southern tip of Anglesey. Car parking costs £4 during the day but the barrier is up and it appears to be free during the evenings.

A family walk around Lepe Loop, Hampshire

“Are we near the sea yet?” my son asked as we drove into the beach car park at Lepe Country Park. “Er, yes, look in front of you”. To be fair, the drive down hadn’t provided any of the tantalising sea glimpses that normally precede arrival at a beach. But now the Solent sparkled just a few metres away.

Continue reading A family walk around Lepe Loop, Hampshire

A walk to Hurst castle, Hampshire

£9 for a 10 minute bus ride? I thought the driver had misheard me so I repeated our destination, Milford-on-Sea. Yes, the figure was correct; £2.50 per child and £4 per adult for a single fare.  It would have been cheaper to get a taxi, and quicker given the bus was running 25 minutes late. With gritted teeth I paid the fare and made a mental note to avoid buses in future.

Continue reading A walk to Hurst castle, Hampshire