Symmetry, Buscot Park

Heritage open day at Buscot Park gardens, Oxfordshire

Last weekend thousands of buildings opened their doors for free as part of the yearly Heritage Open Days event. We had an afternoon spare so after browsing the events website for inspiration I decided on a walk around Buscot Park gardens. The grounds around the house cover over 100 acres and encompass formal gardens, woodland and lakes

Clock house, Buscot Park
Clock house, Buscot Park

If you’ve read much of this blog you’ll probably realise I prefer ruined castles to stately homes. And mountains and wild beaches rather than manicured gardens. But I was pleasantly surprised by Buscot Park. It was quirky enough to hold my attention; or perhaps I’m just reaching the age of garden appreciation!

Four Seasons Walled Garden

Walled garden, Buscot Park
Walled garden, Buscot Park

We started with a walk around the Four Seasons walled garden, where each section represents a different season. Transformed from a redundant kitchen garden by Lord Faringdon it mixes flowers and shrubs with ornamental vegetables. We had probably missed it at its summery best but roses and dahlias provided plenty of late season colour.

Dahlia in the walled garden, Buscot Park
Dahlia in the walled garden, Buscot Park

There are a variety of sculptures and features around the grounds which add interest. The kids enjoyed posing alongside replica terracotta warriors. In the Swinging Garden we had a family swing on one of four large swings that surround a sycamore seed sculpture. Elsewhere there are urns and obelisks, a sundial and pyramid to discover.

Terracotta army imposters at Buscot Park!
Terracotta army imposters at Buscot Park!

The over-riding impression of the grounds was, for me, symmetry. From woodland avenues to clipped hedges I loved the straight lines, replication and long vistas.

Terracotta urn, Buscot Park
Terracotta urn, Buscot Park

Buscot House

Our walk took us up to the open parkland directly in front of Buscot House. The house was built between 1779 and 1783, and is today managed by Lord Faringdon on behalf of the National Trust. From the outside it looks rather austere and imposing. Inside there are many notable works of art, added to over the years by Lord Faringdon.

Buscot House
Buscot House

I decided it best not to visit. The kids were busy rolling down slopes and giving each other piggybacks. It wasn’t long before one of them took things too far and I could just imagine some delicate piece of art being damaged by a mistimed push!

By avoiding the house I belatedly realised I’d missed seeing the frescoes near the outside swimming pool. Painted in the 1930s, these depict friends of the family, including the intriguing Lord Berners who we learnt about when we visited nearby Faringdon Folly.

Peto Water Garden

My favourite part of the estate was the Italianete style water garden designed by the landscape architect Harold Peto. Water flows through a canal, under bridges, past statues and hedges to reach the Big Lake.

Buscot Park water garden
Buscot Park water garden

I loved this statue covered in moss. It blends in so well with its surroundings and is much more atmospheric than a sterile stone sculpture.

Camouflage statue, Buscot Park
Camouflage statue, Buscot Park

Wandering around the Big Lake we discovered a rolling bridge linked to a small island. Part of the bridge was missing, presumably locked away to stop inquisitive people getting on to the island. Although almost everyone we saw pulled the chain and tried to discover how it worked.

Peto water garden, Buscot Park
Peto water garden, Buscot Park

From the lake we headed back up to the house via Monkey Puzzle Avenue. I had been looking forward to walking between huge rows of monkey puzzle trees. Little did I know they were only a metre or so high! I’ve since read they only grow around 35 cm per year.

Fountain, Buscot Park
Fountain, Buscot Park

We rounded off our afternoon with a visit to the cafe. I’d read one Trip Advisor review bemoaning the lack of National Trust cafe. Personally I much preferred the small cafe. It wasn’t the slickest of operations but our cakes were yummy and half the cost of the usual NT fare. The perfect way to round off the afternoon!

More info:

  • Buscot Park is open periodically from April to September, check the website calendar for full details. Opening time is usually from 2pm. Entrance is free for National Trust members. Otherwise the adult price is £10 to visit the house and garden or £7 to visit just the garden. Children aged 5-15 years old are half-price.

12 thoughts on “Heritage open day at Buscot Park gardens, Oxfordshire”

    1. Hi Mary, the warriors looked like they’d been there for a while and I didn’t see any signs to say they were temporary. Quite a lot of the art installations looked new.

  1. Your comment at the start about prefering wild beaches and ruined castes to manicured gardens made me smile, I too have reached that age where the beautifully kept gardens are beginning to find their appeal and I find myself stopping to look at eye catching plants. What a great day to take advantage of and it looks like there is plenty to explore in the gardens keeping it interesting for all ages. That Italian style water garden does look impressive.

    Thank you for stopping by and sharing on #CountryKids

  2. Hi Christine, the Heritage Open Day event sounds a great way to encourage people to get out and explore local history. The Buscot Park gardens do look impressive (and so neat and tidy!). I love the colour of that dahlia, so deep and red, proper autumnal!

    The water garden sounds like a work of art and I like the fact the statues are mossed up. Who likes shiny and new?…It’s a shame you didn’t go in, but I totally understand where you are coming from. Boisterous children and delicate works of art just don’t go together.

    xx

  3. Beautifully kept gardens aren’t usually compatible with really outdoorsy kids I find (although that could just be my rowdy rabble) but this place and it’s quirky appeal looks like a great place to mooch and explore.

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