Seven Sisters Country Park, near Seaford, East Sussex

Whilst visiting friends on the south coast we made a quick trip to the Seven Sisters Country Park, near Seaford.

The park is easily accessible from the A259 and offers walking trails, canoeing on the Cuckmere River and a valley floor cycle route. Most visitors come here to see the Seven Sisters, the name given to the chalk cliffs.  If you’re hoping to photograph the classic postcard view of these, ensure you take the footpath to Seaford Head on the opposite side of the Cuckmere River.

As it was a sweltering hot day we decided to walk the 2 km easy access path down to the shingle beach at Cuckmere Haven.  This appears to be the most popular option, as there were many other families and groups of language students walking the same route.

Walking in the Seven Sisters Country Park, near Seaford
Walking in the Seven Sisters Country Park, near Seaford

After reaching the beach, the lure of walking to the top of the first cliff was too great to ignore.  The kids had no intention of walking any further on such a hot day, and stayed on the beach (with a responsible adult of course).

Seven Sisters
Seven Sisters

The path up was straightforward, although rather steep in places. We took a short break half way up, supposedly to admire the view but really it was just a convenient excuse for a breather.  Looking back down we could see the artificially straightened River Cuckmere and the salt lagoon just north of the beach.

View back down over the beach
View back down over the beach

The view from the top of the cliff is one of the best in southern England. At this point I was very glad not to have bought youngest son up with me as the cliff edges are completely open and accessible to all. Visitors are, quite rightly, left to judge the safety themselves rather than be faced with fences or keep out signs.

From the top of the Seven Sisters
From the top of the Seven Sisters

We sat on top for a while, reluctant to leave such a magnificent view. Eventually the prospect of a cold drink at the cafe appealed and we headed back  towards the park entrance.  Despite it being late afternoon a bus deposited another large group of visitors just as we were leaving – I hope they enjoyed their visit as much as I did.

We visited the Seven Sisters again in 2017, this time as part of our South Downs Way walk. The view was no less spectacular!

More info:

  • There is a seasonal visitor centre and cafe next to the car park.  You can pick up leaflets with walk routes and a map from the car park and bus stop.
  • The bus stop is opposite the visitor centre, with frequent buses from Brighton, Seaford and Eastbourne.
  • The trail to the beach is designated as easy access, and is suitable for wheelchairs and buggies.   Once you reach the beach you’ll have to contend with shingle.

Further info: http://www.sevensisters.org.uk

High wire adventures at TreeRunners, Andover

I was browsing Trip Advisor for something to do at the weekend and came across TreeRunners, which offers courses similar to Go Ape. I was pleased to find they were suitable for 6+ years (subject to a height restriction), and as they’re based in Andover, Hampshire only an hours drive from home.

Continue reading High wire adventures at TreeRunners, Andover

Uptonogood 2013, Oxfordshire

I’m not a fan of heavy rain. After running Reading Half Marathon in atrocious conditions earlier this year I’m firmly of the opinion that my enjoyment of outdoor activities is weather dependent.

When the other half decided to enter a local mountain biking event, Uptonogood, I held off making a decision until the day beforehand so I could check the weather forecast first. Despite very windy conditions there was no rain predicted so I signed up too.

Continue reading Uptonogood 2013, Oxfordshire

A day trip to Herm

Small islands have always held an attraction for me. Perhaps it’s because we live as far inland as possible on this island of ours that we often choose to holiday on an island. And if there happens to be another island nearby that’s even better!  So it’s probably not surprising that on our recent trip to Guernsey we spent a day on Herm, the smallest of the Channel Islands open to the public.

Continue reading A day trip to Herm

Campsite review: Fauxquets Valley, Guernsey

We loved this campsite!
Reception and shop at Fauxquets Valley campsite
Reception and shop at Fauxquets Valley campsite

Fauxquets Valley is located in a rural area in central Guernsey. It offers pitches for tents and camper vans, fully equipped tents and a couple of log cabins to rent.  There are a variety of camping areas, with separate areas for large tents or outback camping for those who don’t need an electric hook up.

Despite it being the May Bank Holiday weekend the site was pretty quiet and we were able to choose our own pitch on arrival.  We had mixed weather during our stay, with heavy rain on two nights, but the terraced pitch drained well.

Roland and Teresa, the owners, were friendly and welcoming.  They were permanently busy but happy to chat and provide recommendations for walks and places to eat. Roland has mapped out some walks in the locality, and can point out a short walk in the valley which is perfect for an evening stroll.
A group of 50+ French children arrived on a school trip a couple of days into our stay. Fortunately they used tents in a separate field and had their own group toilets and showers so we weren’t disturbed.  Although they did commandeer the sockets in the ironing room for their phone chargers – and a coffee machine!

The campsite pool

The campsite pool

Facilities at Fauxquets

The toilets and showers were kept clean. I’m not sure how they’d cope at the height of the season as there were only three showers for ladies, three for men and a disabled shower but we had no problems during our stay. There is a playground for young children, a large field for ball games, an outdoor swimming pool, a TV room and a games room. We didn’t brave the pool as it was a cool week but we did hear shouts and splashes from more hardy souls.  The TV room was very small but to be fair, you don’t generally come camping to sit and watch the box!
The shop offers the usual camping and food basics, as well as newspapers, postcards, hot drinks and pre-ordered bakery goods.  It was open in the morning and late afternoon during our stay but all day during high season.  There’s a small sunny terrace outside, with free wifi, and a covered seating area with conservatory style furniture.
A wood fired pizza van operates a couple of times a week. We enjoyed an excellent goats cheese and red onion pizza (£6) with our Greek pasta salad one night.
Help yourself to herbs
Help yourself to herbs
The best part of the campsite though was the small area of farm animals – piglets, lambs, chickens etc. The piglets were very cute and the source of the sausages and other pork products on sale in the shop!
Piggy
We completed a variety of family walks in Guernsey and we also popped over the beautiful island of Herm for a day trip. Highly recommended if you get the chance!

More info: